Employment related torts

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Author: News from the IDS Employment Law Team
Resource type: IDS Bulletins
Since 2001 there has been a wealth of case law on the question of when an employer should be held vicariously liable for acts of violence committed by its employees. Debbie Grennan considers the application of the key principles and, in particular, the impact of the recent Court of Appeal judgment in the conjoined appeals of Weddell v Barchester Healthcare Ltd and Wallbank v Wallbank Fox Designs Ltd.
Author: News from the IDS Employment Law Team
Resource type: IDS Bulletins
In Weddall v Barchester Healthcare Ltd; Wallbank v Wallbank Designs Ltd the Court of Appeal has held that an employer was vicariously liable for an employee attacking his manager after being given an instruction.
Author: News from the IDS Employment Law Team
Resource type: IDS Bulletins
In JGE v English Province of Our Lady of Charity the High Court has held that the Catholic church could be vicariously liable for the actions of a priest, even though the relationship between them was not akin to employment.
Author: Peter Schofield, Ellis Whittam
Resource type: ELA Briefing
It is established law that an employer who gives a reference for a former employee owes that employee a duty to take reasonable care and is liable to the employee in negligence if the employee suffers loss as a result of lack of care.
Author: Bill Waite, The Risk Advisory Group and Fraser Younson, Berwin Leighton Paisner LLP
Resource type: Lecture Notes
Author: News from the IDS Employment Law Team
Resource type: IDS Bulletins
In McKie v Swindon College the High Court (Queen's Bench Division) has held that an employer was liable to its former employee in damages for negligent misstatement when passing on information about him to a subsequent employer. In reaching that decision, the Court extended the existing categories of tortious liability beyond the situation in which a former employer supplies a negligent reference.
Author: News from the IDS Employment Law Team
Resource type: IDS Bulletins
The Ministry of Justice has today published guidance on the procedures that commercial organisations should put in place to prevent persons associated with them from bribing. Adequate anti-bribery procedures will enable organisations to rely on the statutory defence to a charge of failing to prevent bribery under S.7 of the Bribery Act 2010. As previously announced, organisations now have three months to familiarise themselves with the guidance prior to the Act coming into force on 1 July 2011.
Author: Philip Mead, Old Square Chambers
Resource type: Lecture Notes
Author: Nichola Peters, Andrew Taggart and Sarah Hitchins, Herbert Smith LLP
Resource type: ELA Briefing
The Bribery Act 2010 constitutes a significant reform of the criminal law in relation to bribery offences committed by individuals and organisations in the UK and overseas.
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