Employment related torts

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Author: Clive Howard, Russell Jones & Walker
Resource type: ELA Briefing
Establishing the foreseeability of psychiatric injury was once again the difficulty in a recent stress at work claim.
Author: Dan Lavender is a partner and Lois Kill an assistant in the employment litigation department at Macfarlanes
Resource type: ELA Briefing
On 2 May, the House of Lords gave three overlapping judgments in the cases of Douglas v Hello!, OBG v Allan and Mainstream Properties v Young that clarify the law relating to economic torts. Liability for these torts can arise in a variety of circumstances, such as where business rivals stray over the line of acceptable competition or where teams of employees are hired by a competitor in breach of obligations to their existing employer. Dan Lavender and Lois Kill report
Author: Michael Skrein, Emma Lenthall, Reed Smith Richards Butler LLP
Resource type: Lecture Notes
Author: Toby Kempster, Old Square Chambers
Resource type: Lecture Notes
Author: Anthony Morton-Hooper, Mishcon de Reya, Solicitors
Resource type: Lecture Notes
Author: Mark Kaye, Berwin Leighton Paisner LLP
Resource type: ELA Briefing
The increasing number of work-related stress claims is a cause for concern for employers. Mark Kaye reports The landmark Court of Appeal decision of 2002 in the case of Sutherland v Hatton was warmly welcomed by employers on the basis that it was largely considered to be a pro-employer decision.
Author:
Resource type: IDS Bulletins
In Intel Corporation (UK) Ltd v Daw, the Court of Appeal has upheld the verdict of a High Court judge that an employer was liable in negligence for its failure to take steps to reduce the workload of a stressed employee.
Author: Paul Infield, 5 Paper Buildings
Resource type: Lecture Notes
Author: Peter Linstead, Clarendon Chambers
Resource type: ELA Briefing
decision – Hartman v South Essex Mental Health and Community Care NHS Trust – gives further guidance on liability in negligence for psychiatric injury at work. While endorsing the principles laid down in its earlier decision of Hatton v Sutherland, the Court of Appeal made it clear that those principles may be of limited value in cases which do not involve excessive work load.
Author: Brian Langstaff QC, Cloisters
Resource type: ELA Briefing
Tort concepts can increasingly be argued in employment law claims, and vice versa. This is best illustrated where an individual claims to have suffered psychiatric injury as the result of harassment or bullying at work. Convergence makes life more difficult for the lawyers who have to advise on the choice of the route to compensation. Brian Langstaff QC asks whether you can practise as an employment lawyer without being a personal injury specialist as well
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